Smart Eating – All about Dietitians

Smart Eating – Learning about food through our dietitian services

We all eat, but do we eat in a smart way?  A way that enhances our health, improves our mood, reduces chances of illness and helps keep our bones healthy and strong? In this post we’re looking beyond the fad diets, digging a bit deeper into what dietitians do, and how they can help you become smarter around your eating and your health in general.

All about dietitians

Let’s take the “diet” out of “dietitian”

Dieting in our modern society has taken on a mind of its own, with a plethora of companies offering quick fixes, detoxes, apps and the latest “sure thing”.  We’re not talking about those here – we’re talking about the role food plays in your health and well-being and how it fits into your health journey as just one of many puzzle pieces.  Dietitians don’t offer you quick fixes or fads, but they do work with you to help you understand the role food plays in keeping you healthy and well. 

What does a dietitian do?

The role of a dietitian varies depending on your own needs, but in essence dietetics is defined by the International Confederation of Dietetic Associations (ICDA) as:

“A professional who applies the science of food and nutrition to promote health, prevent and treat disease to optimise the health of individuals, groups, communities and populations.”[1]

So depending on your own health needs, a dietitian may work with you to:

  • Provide advice around nutrition, such as the types of food to eat, and the essential vitamins and minerals your body needs to function properly,
  • Help manage conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancer, and to explain the role of diet and nutrition within your overall treatment plan,
  • Help with food allergies and intolerances such as allergies to nuts or seafood or intolerances to food groups such as dairy or grains.
  • Provide advice around weight loss (or gain), within the bigger picture of food for health.

Dietitians won’t just ask you what you eat, but may also ask you questions around your medical history, family history, levels of activity and lifestyle, and your health goals.

How do I find a dietitian?

You’re in luck – we have one right here!  SwiftDoc offers online consultations with our dietitian Sean Stecko, available directly to your chosen device.  Just book in online and he’ll call you back at the time you select.  So get comfy and talk to Sean from your favourite chair at home (or squeeze in an appointment while sitting next the sports fields while the kids are training.

The best place to start is with a 60 minute initial assessment, then you can book in for 30 minute progress appointments as you move along your health journey.

Dietitian vs dietician

And that age-old question – is it dietitian or dietician?

Believe it or not, there is a story behind this!  The word “dietitian” was found in print from as early as 1846.  Then, in 1906 the Oxford English Dictionary published a variant spelling as “dietician”. 

In 1967, the International Labour Office adopted the spelling as “dietitian” at the request of the dietetics community.  You’d think things would end there, but not quite.  Dictionary producer Merriam-Webster states that word inclusions are in part based on common usage, and at the turn of the century (up to around 2010), the word “dietician” was still commonly used, and therefore still appeared in the dictionary. 

In most recent years, the word “dietitian” has taken the lead however and is now used at least as often (and probably more) than “dietician”, so it appears that eventually the word “dietician” will be phased out altogether.

Importantly, Dietitians Australia and the International Confederation of Dietetic Associations prefer “dietitians” so as such, we too are firmly in the “dietitian” camp here at SwiftDoc.

However you want to spell it…a dietitian is a vital piece of the puzzle in your journey to good health – book an appointment today!

Sources:

Better Health, Dietitians.  Accessed February 2021.

[1]Dietitians Australia, Definition of a Dietitian. Accessed February 2021.

International Confederation of Dietetic Associations, The ‘c’ in dietitians – a long history and fading future (maybe). Accessed February 2021.

This website does not provide medical advice.  It is intended for informational purposes only.  It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment.  If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately dial Triple 0 (000).